Filled in Florals

I’m on the Foiled Fox blog today showing off these lovely new stamps and dies from Concord & 9th. The stamps are from the ‘filled in florals‘ set and the dies from the simple serif alphabet set I love the size and shape of these letters and I am able to line them up neatly by using my new magnetic ‘staytion‘ so I won’t need to do the purposely wonky look every time!

I reached for some favourite distress stains to colour the big flower from the set. I used a stamp positioner but acrylic blocks would work fine too as precision is not key for this loose and watery look. As I’m still working with distress stain daubers I swiped the first colour across a third of the stamp, stamped on hot pressed watercolour paper then wiped off the stamp before inking with the next stain in the centre of the flower then repeating the process. I only spritzed the stamp lightly with water before I stamped the last colour on each flower as I didn’t want to flood the design but I did want to make sure the colours did a little blending with each other. I used a mix of blueprint sketch, salty ocean, seedless preserves and dusty concord stains on the flowers switching around the order and combo each time.  I stamped the flower centres with blueprint sketch and seedless preserves ink. Is there a more beautiful colour combination than those two stains? I don’t think so!

For the leaves I switched to an acrylic block and inked with bundled sage and iced spruce stains and a little spritz of water to make them soft and dreamy. I dried the whole panel before dropping water here and there all over, letting it sit and soak in then absorbing it with a paper towel to leave all those watermarks on the leaves and petals. Last but not least I added a splat or two in blueprint sketch and bundled sage.

Once all those flowers were done I thought about the sentiment. I know I should consider the sentiment earlier in the process but I rarely do. I didn’t want to cover up too much of the design so I went for the subtle stacked letter die look. I cut the letters b e s t out of the panel and three more of each from blank watercolour paper then stacked them up and attached them on the card. I did some stamp surgery to separate  ‘you’re the’ from one of the sentiment stamps in the ‘filled in florals’ set and stamped in versamark ink so I could emboss in white powder. The sentiment is fairly subtle when you look straight on but the recipient will be able to see and feel the texture of the raised letters.

Thank you for dropping in today, make sure you pop on over to the Foiled Fox for some extra details and to check out their lovely blog and store.

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Floral Background

I don’t know how many of you follow Laura Bassen’s blog or youtube channel but if you do you will know where today’s inspiration came from. Nine times out of ten you will find her blending, stamping, painting or piecing a rainbow on her cards. I rarely include the whole spectrum on my cards; I’ll blend from pink to blue or blue to green or yellow to pink but not too many rainbows. I decided this full background stamp from The Stamp Market was a good place to start.

I embossed the whole design on hot pressed watercolour paper using my misti and a sticky grid. Sticky grids are so useful with a large stamp and panel. The grid kept the watercolour paper in place while I stamped with versamark three times. The stamp is large and detailed so I wanted to make sure I got a really good impression, hence the three applications of versamark. I embossed in clear then taped the panel to my glass mat and swiped distress stains across the panel in rainbow order, light to darkest. I still have quite a few distress stain daubers so I used them but you could paint distress stain or reinker across your panel with a paint brush instead of using daubers. I spritzed the panel after I’d applied all the colours and used a paintbrush to blend between colours in a few places. I decided not to dry it with a heat tool because I didn’t want to push any of the stain around the panel, instead I let it air dry and polished stain off the embossing later with a paper towel.

While I had the stamp and stains out I did the negative of the first card and swiped the stains across the stamp before spritzing a little water to start the blending process. I used the MISTI to press the stamp down on my hot pressed watercolour paper and could see through the transparent stamp where the blending was happening.

Another technique I haven’t used before is the layered shadow die sentiment. I haven’t had any shadow dies but the Foiled Fox sent me this one and I did a black on white and a white on black to make the sentiments stand out on both colourful backgrounds. I added double sided adhesive sheets to both black and white cardstocks before die cutting to make it easier to attach the sentiments to the cards.

Hope you are having a colourful day!

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Blooming journal page

I’m been working in one of my Fabriano Venezia art journals again experimenting with vintage style. I started by painting absorbant ground over the double page spread then stamped the PB ‘script’ stamp in tea dye and antique linen distress inks. I spritzed the inked stamp before pressing it onto the page so I would get blurred prints.

Once that dried I spread modeling paste through the PB hypnotic stencil and had to go and do something else so I wouldn’t mess it up before it was dry. Even so I still stuck my finger on it while it was wet and smudged some.

Once the paste dried I spritzed the ‘see ya latte’ shimmerz spray over the pages then wiped it off the stencilled area so it would darken the background. I am not an experienced art journaller but I am using one to try things out. On this page I was trying to create a vintage look. I stamped the ‘timeless’ rose stamp from Penny Black three times in brown distress inks then blended the ink into the petals. My journal is not watercolour paper so ink and paint don’t move on the page as easily. I didn’t like the roses enough to keep them all, instead I covered some with flowers cut from leftover Italian papers. I glued them on with matte medium and painted diluted gesso over them to decrease the contrast then added a bit of distress vintage medium for the aged tea stain look.

I did a smaller collage of flowers on the opposite corner then stamped PB winter branches over the pages with vintage photo and ground espresso distress inks. I added some pretty scroll stamping with the PB set ‘flourish borders’ in white ink and some more of the ‘script’ stamp in brown ink. Tattered rose distress stain matched the paper flowers so I splattered a decent amount of that over everything too! I mentioned on my previous journal page post how I struggle with adding words to a page. I chose a quote from Ruth Chou Simon’s book ‘Gracelaced‘ which encourages and challenges me every time I open it. I wanted to write the words with my nib pen but when I tried, the ink spread into the page and looked like a blob so I wrote on calligraphy paper, tore the words into strips and glued them over the blob. Some of the letters are blurred because I didn’t let it dry long enough. I need a bit more patience when working in my art journals…

Not exactly what I set out to create but as I said, the art journal is for playing with mediums and ideas. Have a great day

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What? More poppies!

Yes I have another poppy post for you. When I get new stamps I like to try a few different techniques with them if I have time. This large poppy from the Altenew ‘Wonderland’ set was crying out to be stamped and painted with distress stains.

There is a masking stencil that co-ordinates with this stamp set so I started with the large stencil full of poppy shapes and a piece of hot pressed watercolour paper. I painted water into the large poppy shape so I could drop colour into it and get very soft blends. I don’t know if you ever paint with water but you can probably imagine the main problem with doing so. That’s right, it’s hard to see what you’re doing, especially if you are wearing your everyday glasses not your ‘art glasses’ Once I dropped some worn lipstick stain into the puddle I was able to make out the poppy shape a little better. I moved the colour around gently with a brush and dropped some festive berries stain in the centre for extra depth and some forest moss stain at the base of the petals and down the stem. I painted my own leaves with the forest moss stain. Once the stain had dried a bit I used the large poppy stamp to stamp some detail over the top in festive berries and forest moss stain. The stamp outline doesn’t match the painted shape exactly but I like the artsy hand painted look.

My second poppy was done with just the stamp plus four distress stains. I painted mustard seed stain around the top of the petals, carved pumpkin across the middle and fired brick at the base. I painted mowed lawn on the stem and base of the flower. I spritzed the stamp then used the stamp positioner to stamp on hot pressed watercolour paper. The result was a very wet rainbow style image. I painted one strip of petal at a time starting at the yellow end and working toward the red so the blend would go from light to dark and not be taken over by the dark red stain. I worked on strips that were not adjacent to each other to give sections a chance to dry before I painted the one next door. Although the poppy was quite wet with stain and water I was able to keep subtle details on the petals.

The last card is my favourite, I like the depth of colour achieved with a seedless preserves/festive berries/peeled paint combo. I used the same method as for the previous card but blended larger sections which caused some of the petal detail to disappear. I also dried the poppies after blending the colour once then added more stain and water over the top which created some petal like watermarks.

When it came time to turn the panels into cards I just wanted to add a little texture or dimension.  I chose to pop up each panel on foam but before doing that I put my panels inside an embossing folder and ran them through my die cutting machine. The folder gives the panel the look of canvas. Subtle but cool.

I stamped the two Dr Seuss quotes from the same ‘Wonderland’ set on little scraps and added them to two of the cards with removable adhesive because I’m not convinced they are needed. What do you think? I like the quotes but I also like the way the poppies look like mini canvases…

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At Grace

These lovely magnolias are part of the new ‘Timeless’ release from Penny Black. The stamp is quite a large one but I have stamped twice on this panel to cover most of the card front. I used my stamp positioner so I could build up the colour in the petals step by step.

I started by stamping the whole stamp in scattered straw distress ink on hot pressed watercolour paper. While in the positioner I used dried marigold, carved pumpkin, spiced marmalade and rusty hinge inks or markers to gradually add darker colours on the flowers to create depth and shadow. I painted over some of the petals to soften the blends then moved on to stamp the leaves and stems in forest moss stain. Finally I inked the centre of the flowers with a black soot marker to stamp the patterned section.

Before stamping the sentiment from the new ‘sentiment stamp set’ in versafine clair nocturne ink I splattered some green and orange ink over the panel.

I am thoroughly enjoying reading what your favourite flowers are. Thank you for participating in the giveaway: it is still open so pop over to my previous post if you haven’t entered yet.

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Angelique

These pretty blooms represent my first experiment with an Altenew layering floral stamp set; this one is called ‘Angelique’. I clearly remember my Stampin’ Up days with the 2-step stamping but I haven’t done any in a while. I don’t think the layering sets are necessarily designed for watercolour styles but you know that’s how I like to do things. I experimented with a few processes, stamping then spritzing and spritzing then stamping, spritzing the paper not the stamp, the stamp not the paper and spritzing everything!

I think, but I’m not exactly sure, I mainly spritzed the stamp for this panel with maybe a tiny spritz after stamping on that left hand flower. I started by stamping the largest layer in spun sugar distress stain. Next layer I stamped in worn lipstick distress ink with a spritz of water to dilute it, the final detail layer I stamped in festive berries distress ink. Because I started with stain and spritzed the ink before stamping the image was wet enough to soften and blend a bit. I did a bit with a paint brush too but I didn’t want to lose the detailed layers.

The leaves I did in a similar manner with bundled sage, mowed lawn and forest moss.  The sentiment from Altenew’s Leaf Canopy set is embossed in white on a red cardstock strip and popped up on dimensional foam tape.


The second panel was stamped with less spritzing during the stamping process, just a little in fact on layer number two. Instead I waited until all the stamping was done and spritzed in one direction to make the petals feather out then the other direction to balance things. This time I used abandoned coral, fired brick and aged mahogany inks for the roses, milled lavender and dusty concord for the little flowers and old paper, shabby shutters and peeled paint for the leaves. Even though it looks like black, I matted the panel with purple cardstock and added an embossed sentiment also on purple and cut it out with the Avery Elle sentiment dies that are making me neat and happy right now.

You might be wondering why I don’t just stamp these very pretty floral stamps with out adding any spritzes of water?? Sorry I just don’t think I can do it…

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Thanks for being thoughtful

I have yet another distress stain no-line watercolour card for you today. I have received a few questions about my recent distress stain outline cards. Readers have asked if I stamped with ink of some kind first then painted the stain. Not for this card or the previous two. I ink the stamp with stain which is much more ‘liquidy’ than ink and stamp with a stamp positioning tool on watercolour paper. The stain soaks in a little but also sits on top of the paper for a short time. I try to blend straight away so I can take advantage of the wetness of the stain.

For this panel I inked the flowers with ripe persimmon and fired brick distress stain. You can paint both onto the stamp then print or you can do one colour then the other, allowing the stains to overlap a bit for some nice blending.  I inked the leaves and stems with forest moss and mowed lawn then blended the leaves after stamping. If you have stains but haven’t tried inking your stamps with them it does create some pretty blends and the only outline colours are the ones you are blending into the petals and leaves.

As with my other recent cards I added a sentiment in black ink and a simple frame cut with the square frames dies. The sentiment set is called ‘sending thanks’ and is a little set with lots of possibilities!

Thanks for dropping by this week; I’ll be back on Monday for a blog hop and other exciting news!

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