Snowfield

I have teamed up with the Foiled Fox today to bring you this snowy scene. It’s all one big beautiful Penny Black stamp called snowfield. The PB scenic stamps are fun to combine with each other or just add a few elements to but I generally stamp them first all by themselves. I like to get to know the stamp because a scenic stamp often has foreground, middle ground and background elements. In order to use watercolour techniques with them I need to work out what part of the stamp I should ink first.

In a snowscape it is also important to think about which parts of the panel need to stay untouched by ink or paint so they can look like fresh white snow! If you pop over to the Foiled Fox blog you will find my step by step process described. I used both water soluble (distress inks) and waterproof (archival inks) on this scene. I blended several colours on the fence posts so those were stamped with distress inks. The details on the trees are very fine so I used archival inks for a solid print along with some distress which I could blend over the larger trunk and branches to fill the silhouette shape. Of course the sky and snow is all done with distress inks because I wanted to add water so I could blend and dilute.

When painting shadows around snowy areas it is sometimes hard to keep all the white areas white; that is where a paint pen, gel pen or some white paint can come in handy for touching up at the end. You can even add paint splatter at the end rather than masking fluid at the beginning if you like.

I hope you take some time to visit the Foiled Fox blog; they have a world of inspiration waiting for you.

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Snowy Panorama

As I post yet another winter scene I can tell you there is still no sign of winter round here. We’ve been having mild fall days. It is weird for it to be so warm with the trees almost bare! To create today’s card I used Penny Black’s ‘panorama’ stamp. I stamped the horizon line first in broken china distress ink. This is a step I often do if I want to paint the sky with the wet on wet technique. By stamping the edge where the snow meets the trees I was able to paint water on the whole panel from the horizon up then add in broken china and uncharted mariner to get a varied blue sky. I did get blue ink on the white tree trunks but I had already decided I would touch them up with white paint at the end of the process.

While the sky was still drying (in the stamp postioner) I inked the distant trees with forest moss and pine needles and stamped. The ink soaked into the damp paper creating the soft focus effect you see above. I dried the panel then switched to an archival ink to stamp the three foreground trees. I also stamped them in black soot distress ink and the lines in the snow with uncharted mariner. I blended a bit with a paint brush but also spritzed lightly to get the inks to feather out a little.

You can probably tell I started with splattered masking fluid on the watercolour panel. I tend to do a few panels at a time so they are ready later when I want to stamp a winter scene. If you don’t want to bother with masking fluid you can always splatter with white paint when you have finished your scene.

Thank you to all who left me a kind message on my Rivulet card post. Many of your guesses were close; like me you picked a brown and a blue. The two inks were uncharted mariner and ground espresso; I love the range of hues I got when those two mixed.

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Rivulet

I love it when I find a stamp that looks like somewhere I’ve been. I couldn’t tell you exactly where this is but I have experienced scenery like this. I’ve said it before but winter here in the dark cold north is very beautiful. This gorgeous PB stamp is called ‘rivulet’ and I used only two inks! I am going to let you guess the inks. I’ll update the links below in a few days but I’d really like to see your guesses. (hint: they are distress inks)

I worked on a piece of hot pressed watercolour paper splattered with masking fluid. I used the splatter brush I have used in the past. It gives a fine splatter. If I want bigger spots masked I will use an old paint brush. I worked in a stamp positioner, stamping first in one ink colour, then partially inking the stamp with the second colour before stamping again. I used a fine tip paint brush to blend the ink to fill the tree trunks and rivulet. I smooshed the inks on my glass mat so I could pick up extra ink if needed to fill some areas.

The panel is larger than my usual 4.25″x 5.5″ but I didn’t want to trim it so I left a little extra space at the bottom of a larger card base for the sentiment from PB set ‘jolly snippets. I have already made a second card with this stamp, changing ink colours to suggest a different time of day. Don’t forget to leave your ink colour guesses for this card in the comments below!

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Autumn in the mountains

Outdoors is pretty ‘speccy’ right now. We don’t have too much of the deep red yet but I have seen it here and there. I have got into the habit of going for a walk or run soon after breakfast so I’ve seen the increase in autumn colours over the last few weeks. Yesterday there was fog when I set out so everything was a bit more muted but by the time I headed home the sun was burning off the fog and the golden tones were shining.

The first step in creating this scene was to stamp the top half of the mountain stamp (PB picturesque) in faded jeans and speckled egg distress inks on hot pressed watercolour paper. I painted below the mountains with water softening the colours at the bottom so there was no distinct line where the mountains ended. I then painted over the top of the mountains with water and dropped some spiced marmalade, forest moss and ground espresso ink into the wet area to add colour.

I dried the panel before starting on the trees using the PB arbors stamp. I stamped with ground espresso, fossilized amber, spiced marmalade and crackling campfire, not all at once, a couple of colours at a time to build up the coverage. I spritzed the stamp before stamping but didn’t spritz the paper.

When I was satisfied with the trees I painted ground underneath them and dried the panel again before blending speckled egg ink in the sky and below the branches. To finish I splattered both water and fossilized amber ink to break up the expanses of blue.

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Trailing leaves

The PB ‘trailing’ stamp featured in this card is definitely a versatile one; it works both hanging down as is here and growing up from the ground.

This card was very simple to make but I love the pretty blends and ‘weeping’ nature of the leaves. I inked the stamp with mowed lawn, chipped sapphire and iced spruce distress inks and stamped it on hot pressed watercolour paper. Soon after stamping I used a wide watercolour brush to paint water downwards over the stamping. The brush pulled ink from the stamping, blending and diluting it in the process.

Once the panel was completely dry I inked the hills from the PB ‘mountain magic’ set in both mowed lawn along the base and then chipped sapphire along the top. I painted over the top with water and pulled the mowed lawn ink below the stamped image to look like the edge of a lake. As I am writing this I’m thinking about trying exactly the same design but in warm autumn tones…

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Lakeside Mountain

How did this happen? Another scenic card just snuck in while I wasn’t looking! I think it might be the fault of this mountain stamp, ‘Picturesque’. It is possibly the perfect stamp to put behind all other scenic stamps! And I haven’t even touched on winter scenes yet!

I stamped the mountains first in hickory smoke distress ink, painted inside the whole area with water and then added some chipped sapphire here and there. Once the ink dried I stamped the ‘quietude stamp in chipped sapphire, rustic wilderness and rusty hinge. I painted chipped sapphire in the sky and the lake and then painted more trees along the shore in the distance and pulled some of the ink into the lake to look like reflections.

Doesn’t it look relaxing, like dusk with cloud cover? Hope you have a lovely weekend.

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Mountain Farm

More mountains, this time the ‘picturesque’ stamp is paired with the ‘farmland’ stamp, once again in a blue and brown colour scheme. I began by making a smooshed ink background with faded jeans and fossilized amber inks.

Once the background was dry I inked the mountains in vintage photo, faded jeans and ground espresso inks taking care not to ink to the bottom of the stamp but instead leaving the lower edge unevenly inked. I did some blending with a paintbrush after stamping to make the mountains less defined.

I inked the farmland stamp in faded jeans along the top then fossilized amber, forest moss and vintage photo in the fields. Again I did a little blending with a paintbrush. Once finished I ran the panel through my die cutting machine with the ‘subtle’ embossing folder from SU to give it a canvas look; you can see the texture in the close up photo.

I hope you have enjoyed all the scenery on the blog lately. What are you hoping to see next? I won’t promise to deliver straight away but I’d love to know what interests you.

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Mountain moonrise

Here is the mountain stamp again, this time paired with the rushes and hills from the mountain magic set. Blue and brown is a favourite colour combo for me at present which works well as long as there are some pale tones or white in the mix.

Once again I began by creating the watercolour background (you can see the technique in the video here). I used diluted faded jeans, mowed lawn and gathered twigs distress inks. Once the background dried I stamped the mountain stamp in faded jeans ink taking care not to ink to the base of the stamp. At the foot of the mountains I stamped the smaller mountain stamp from ‘mountain magic’ set. I blended over both the tall and the short mountains in blue and brown inks.

Before stamping the rushes I blended water along the base of the low mountain image to soften the edge into the lake. Once that was dry I stamped the rushes in faded jeans, gathered twigs and mowed lawn. I created the soft moon image by placing a large drop of water on the panel to sit and dilute the ink. I carefully absorbed the droplet with paper towel and repeated the step.

Although not the brightest and prettiest colour scheme I am loving the moodiness of the scene. I feel like this is the kind of vista I might come across one day if I’m lucky!

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Mountain Sunset

I’ve been enjoying this new mountain stamp from Penny Black, it’s aptly named ‘picturesque’. Although it works beautifully behind other stamps I wanted to show it alone first because when paired it with a sunset sky it really didn’t need more.

The wonder of mountains and sunsets reminds me of the mighty God who made and sustains this earth so I chose a sentiment that gives me the same encouragement.

To create this card I swiped a piece of watercolour paper through faded jeans, kitsch flamingo and scattered straw distress inks. While it dried I sprinkled salt on it to add some texture and pattern.

This is a larger card than my usual but the mountain stamp is also large so it spanned the 6ΒΌ” width. I stamped in Catherine Pooler juniper ink and decided not to blend over the stamping. The pinks of the watercolour looked like the sunset reflecting on snow so I kept the mountain crisp and added the sentiment from PB ‘inspirational sentiments’ in the same ink.

Tomorrow’s post will include this stamp paired with other scenic stamps for a moonlit farm view.

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Combining scenic stamps

I’ve been playing with scenic stamps again, this time combining sections of two stamps to create a new scene. The Penny Black ‘farmland’ stamp forms the background scenery and the PB ‘homeward’ stamp makes up the foreground.

Out of habit (a successful one!) I used distress inks and markers to ink the stamps and add detail to the design. I kept the palette limited using two blues for the sky and several greens and browns for the rest of the scene. To see the process take a look at the video below.

I know some people find scenic stamps a bit daunting but the detail in the stamps themselves makes it possible to add a little or a lot of your own artistry. I hope you find the techniques shown in the video helpful.

You can see cards featuring the farmland stamp on its own here and to see the homeward stamp here.

I mentioned in the video that although I think the fields look authentic I have no idea what the crops might be. If you know of crops that would appear to be rust or olive coloured mention it below!

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