Filigree thank you

This leaf is from a PB stamp set called ‘filligree foliage. I haven’t used it for a few years but it is perfect for creating some autumn leaves. As the name suggests each leaf has a filigree pattern on it but you can’t see it on this card because I am using the stamp for its shape not its pattern. To see cards I’ve made in the past with this set click over here, here and here

I worked on hot pressed watercolour paper and moved the stamp around each time I stamped it. I used abandoned coral and frayed burlap distress inks, an odd combo, but one which seemed to work and even gave me a some purply blue in a few places. After stamping the leaf I immediately blended the ink with a paintbrush and water until I had filled the entire shape diluting all the stamped ink as I did so.

I added a double stacked sentiment die cut from olive green cardstock then ruled a thin brown frame around the edge with the help of the ‘staytion’ magnetic board and ruler. I know the ‘staytion’ was designed with stenciling in mind but it makes lining up die cut words and letters easy as well as ruling lines.

Can you believe I have another card for the current CAS watercolour challenge?

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Blushing blooms

I have coloured this lovely flower a few times lately but I realised I hadn’t posted it all on my blog. I did some no-line colouring with the stamp which took a while due to the number of petals, but still produced a nice result which I’ll share at the end of this post. This weekend I decided to emboss the flower instead and paint it with peerless watercolours. I must say this technique was faster and less fiddly than the no-line petal by petal approach. I embossed two of them and painted them side by side with the same three paint colours. Peerless paint blends beautifully on the paper, in this case hot pressed watercolour paper, and I was able to add royal crimson over the top of flesh tint and vice versa until I was happy with the coverage and blending. The leaves were painted in olive green. I think I’ve mentioned before how much I love the quality, depth and blending of peerless watercolours.

I used the co-ordinating die to cut out both flowers then arranged them on top of a ‘snowfall/speckles’ embossing folder background. I snipped a few of the leaves off and rearranged them to balance the composition. I also glued some pieces directly to the background and popped other pieces up on dimensional foam. The sentiment is from the grateful sentiments set and is embossed and popped up also. Because my orange/pinkish combo is opposite green on the colour wheel this card is a match for the current CAS watercolour challenge, a challenge I love but rarely get my act together to enter!

Here is a similar design I completed as part of my no-line watercolour class. I stamped in antique linen distress ink and used a selection of distress inks as ‘paint’. The sentiment is from a clever Taylored Expressions stamp and die combo.

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Autumn wreaths

Much as I hate to admit it, things are beginning to feel distinctly autumnal. I don’t have any autumn wreaths to hang at home but if I did I think I would like one a bit like this, soft colours and delicate leaves.

I worked in my stamp positioner to create this panel on hot pressed watercolour paper but I think you could easily do it with the stamp on an acrylic block, it might even be faster. I started by tracing a circle on my panel with a pencil. Using the circle as I guide I positioned the branch stamp from Penny Black’s new ‘All Natural’ set so the base stems were on the circle. I inked with rusty hinge, stamped, moved the stamp around the circle a little, stamped in bundled sage, moved it again, stamped in frayed burlap and then repeated until I was all the way around the circle. I used a small watercolour brush to blend inside the leaves adding extra ink when necessary. I love the combination of colours; frayed burlap is new to my collection and I like the way it gets along with the other two inks. Once the blended ink was dry I stamped just a section of the berry stamp around the centre of the wreath in gathered twigs distress ink then blended it to fill the berries.

I used the same sentiment for both cards, it’s from another new and cute PB set called ‘golden delight’. I stamped both times on a little tag from the PB ‘a pocket full’ die set. To finish off the card I wrapped some twine around the panel, added a bow and popped the tag on top.

For the second card I grabbed another stamp from all natural and used the same process but needed a leaf mask cut from post-it note a couple of times where the leaves would have stamped over previous ones. This little stamp has both leaves and berries as well as a curved stem which just happened to conveniently match the curve of my traced circle. I used the same technique of blending the leaves and berries after stamping with forest moss and aged mahogany distress inks.

Both cards requested the splatter treatment and the second card wanted a olive green mat as well.

Hope the days are warm and sunny where you are.

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Wanderlust

Wanderlust is the perfect name for this stamp; I would love to be walking down that lane in Provence! I have a friend with a house in Provence so I am curious to hear whether if I’ve managed to capture the look. To create this lavender themed panel I started by painting the watercolour paper in pale distress stains. I wet the whole panel then painted the bottom half in mustard seed stain. I was way too heavy handed and the result was bright yellow! I quickly whisked the panel to the sink and rinsed it off which resulted the pale yellow you see in the centre of the road. With the panel still wet I painted the sky area in broken china distress stain. I dried the panel and placed it in a stamp positioner to do all the stamping. There was a certain amount of back and forth with my stamping, blending, over-stamping etc but I will try and give you the gist of it. All the stamping is done with oxide inks on this panel so I would have more of an oil or acrylic painting look (something like this beauty by Maria Bertan). I stamped the trees and roadside grasses in peeled paint and forest moss distress oxide ink, wiping off the tips of the grasses on the right hand corner so I could ink with dusty concord oxide ink.

As I built up colour on the trees it was sometimes easiest to ink a large area with the oxide ink then wipe ink off the stamp where I didn’t want that colour. I also pressed the oxide ink pads down on my glass mat so I could pick up colour with a paint brush and apply it to the panel that way. As oxide inks are part dye ink and part pigment I was able to clear emboss over the stamping part way through the process to ‘lock’ in the colour on the foreground trees, grass and background trees. The ‘lavender field’ area is blank when stamped so I painted the rows of lavender with dusty concord and some spots of peeled paint oxide ink, the far fields in crushed olive and the road edges in diluted vintage photo. I loved the pops of purple so much I brought them into my second version also but not in the same way.

The second card is a looser watercolour look done with no oxides just the original distress inks and markers. I stamped the trees and grasses with forest moss, peeled paint and candied apple (roadside poppies). I was able to get some variety on the trees and grass by blending with a paint brush and re-stamping over the top.

The adjacent field is painted in wild honey distress ink then there is a dusty concord field further back. To get the blended effect I also spritzed my stamp not the panel so water was transferred from the stamp to the paper in certain areas not over the whole scene. While the inks were still damp I painted a tumbled glass and dusty concord sky around the tree tops and down to the hill edges. Some of the green ink bled into the sky but not too much. Finally I painted the road with vintage photo distress ink.

Have you been to Provence? Does it look a bit like this? Or, like me, do you want to go there now?

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Homeward

I have some more scenic stamping to share and without meaning to I have used an autumn colour scheme. Fall is going to come too soon as it is I didn’t mean to hurry it along!

When creating my previous scenic cards I stamped and painted the trees and scenery first, clear embossed them and added the ground, sea and sky last. For this scene I painted the sky first then stamped over it. I used weathered wood, stormy sky, and fossilized amber inks to fill the panel and create the look of sunset or sunrise in the background. I kept the colour very pale and diluted at the bottom of the panel as I knew stamping would cover the foreground anyway.

I dried the panel before putting it in a stamp positioner to create the scene. I inked the base of the stamp with fossilized amber and along the horizon with rusty hinge distress ink. The tree trunk, branches and the fence I inked with ground espresso and black soot markers. The foliage is a mix of vintage photo and rusty hinge ink. I used rusty hinge to paint a foreground rise also.

Believe it or not there I still have more stamped scenes to show you. I will probably toss a floral into the mix here and there too as I did this week. I’m not quite ready to be showing you Christmas cards yet but it won’t be long!

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A Teddy and a Present

Can you believe there is a teddy bear card on my blog? I am having trouble believing it myself. Not that I have anything against teddy bears, in fact I have a soft spot for Winnie the Pooh in particular, but I have never done any teddy bear stamping and colouring before!

I kept things simple with this sweet stamp from Penny Black, it’s called ‘a present’ and I’ve paired it with a sentiment from the PB ‘peaceful time’ set. I worked on hot pressed watercolour paper and did the initial stamping with antique linen distress ink. I decided to keep my colour scheme simple; it could almost be called a primary colour scheme except that the ‘yellow’ component is more of a brown. I smooshed rusty hinge, blueprint sketch and candied apple distress inks onto my glass mat and diluted them as needed with a paintbrush and water. To paint the image I worked on one section at a time and never on adjacent sections one after the other, that way I let each section dry before painting beside it.

I didn’t do anything too fancy on this, my first teddy bear panel. The whole bear is painted with rusty hinge ink, I just use undiluted ink in places where I wanted shadow or definition. I used  markers at the end to add detail that had faded with the painting.

The little bit of string peeping out the side I went over with a gold gel pen and the sentiment is stamped in versafine red satin ink. To complete the card I matted in red cardstock and attached it to an Alexandra Renke polka dot paper. Then, because I thought it would be cute, I used my 3-in-1 punch board to make a matching polka dot envelope.

Don’t look too closely at teddy, he seems to have tanned one arm way more than the other!

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Sunset

More scenery! Wouldn’t you like to be there right now? Maybe you are…
This stamp is from Penny Black, it’s called ‘paradise‘.

If you have read about how I made my recent scenic cards (outback, canoes, oceanside, sailboats) then you already know the drill for this one. I inked and stamped the trees , ground and horizon landmass in a combination of fossilized amber, tea dye, rusty hinge, gathered twigs, ground espresso and black soot distress inks. Basically I started by stamping the whole image in fossilized amber then adding the next darkest ink to sections I wanted darker, stamping that, then adding the next darkest ink to even less of the stamp, stamping that and so on until I had the gradation of sunlit palm frond yellow to thick silhouetted dark brown and black shadows.  Once I had done all that inking and stamping I embossed the whole stamp with versamark and clear powder so the colours were ‘sealed’ on the watercolour paper. The clear embossing step yeilded a bonus effect this time. See those white lines on the top of the palm fronds that look like the light hit them? I think my panel might have moved ever so slightly so I ended up embossing a little bit of un-inked white paper. Happy accident folks!

After the embossing was done I painted the sky with abandoned coral, salty ocean and wilted violet inks. I went all out tropical sunset mode and when that dried used the coral and ocean colours on the water as well. I painted the sandy beach in fossilized amber ink but then wanted it darker in the foreground so blended some rusty hinge and tea dye ink over the sandy area with brushes.

The sentiment kind of chose itself from the Penny Black ‘destinations’ set. I stamped it in distress archival ground espresso ink. Thanks for dropping by today, hope your week is off to a good start.

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