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Brusho Floral Medley video

I have been asked a few times for a video showing how I use brusho for emboss resist panels. It is definitely one of my favourite techniques. I have used it with picture stamps and patterns, with one colour of paint powder or several; the principles are the same. I have added a list of emboss resist cards made with paint powders at the end of this post.

One key point to remember when using brusho over embossing is not to overdo the powder or the water. A little at a time means you can see what patterns and depth of colour are developing before you add anything more. In the video I show my method for moving colour around; I often pick up paint from an area with too much pigment and paint it somewhere else.

Obviously you if you sprinkle paint powder on a panel and then spritz with water it will not stay inside all the lines but that is part of the beauty of this technique. If this is a bit too loose and artsy for you try the same technique over an embossed pattern stamp.

Other cards featuring emboss resist with paint powders
happy cacti, embossed grevillea, roses in bloom, black brusho grid, shimmery summer glow, roses all over, flower garden, happy canada day, felicity, falling florals

Thank you for dropping by today; I hope the technique in the video is something you try one day. Let me know if you do; I’d love to hear or see how it went.

Supplies

Stamps: floral medley, banner sentiments

Die: thankful heart
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Inks: versamark, versafine clair monarch

Paper: hot pressed watercolour, purple cardstock

Paint: terracotta, leaf green, violet brusho

Also: clear embossing powder, double sided adhesive, misti

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An apple a day

Today’s card cannot guarantee you the health benefits of an actual apple but I hope it brings a smile. I stamped and painted it with distress inks and I’m sorry to say I didn’t record the colours. I was attending an all day crop and teaching a few mini classes during the day. My table was set up with inks and stamps and watercolour paper and I came and went from classroom to table resuming my card panels whenever I returned to my table. My best guess would be festive berries, mowed lawn, vintage photo, forest moss, gathered twigs and squeezed lemonade. Maybe I should tell you my process instead because apples come in a range of colours; there is no wrong answer! I used my stamp positioner and worked one colour at a time. I inked the apples in red and wiped any red ink off the leaves before stamping then I used water and a paintbrush to blend all the stamped ink to cover the apple skin. While the area was wet I dropped in some green ink to create some variation and shadow. I dried the red before inking all the leaves in the two greens, stamped and blended them with a paint brush also. I inked the stems in brown and stamped them over the leaves. Once the leaves were dry I also used some brown or maybe forest moss ink to paint the veins back on the leaves. I stamped the centre of the cut apple with brown ink and painted some onto the shadow at the bottom of the apple also. The flesh of the apple looked a bit too stark so I painted some yellow and blended a bit of the red from the edge into the white area as well.

You’ve probably noticed my apple looks like it is in a snow storm. I worked on cold pressed watercolour paper splattered with masking fluid, probably not entirely necessary for a close up apple image but I’m claiming artist’s licence. I had splattered masking fluid over a batch of cold pressed panels in preparation for the all day crop as I was planning to work mainly on snow scenes. When I went to assemble the card I thought the apple needed a bit of shadow to ground it so I painted some diluted festive berries and chipped sapphire ink because they were in reach on my desk. As is often the case for me, I left any thoughts of a sentiment until the end. After a search through my sentiment dies I settled on ‘you’re sweet’ then matted the panel in the same green cardstock.

Do you have an apple a day? I usually do but sometimes there are peaches or mangoes or nectarines that distract me from the humble apple.

Supplies

Stamps: apples

Die: you’re sweet

Inks: festive berries, mowed lawn, vintage photo, forest moss, gathered twigs, squeezed lemonade distress inks

Paper: cold pressed watercolour paper, green cardstock

Tools: stamp positioner, masking fluid

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Autumn Sprigs

Our gratitude week continues both here and on the Foiled Fox blog. Next week we will return to our regularly scheduled programming but the gratitude themed posts will stay open for comments until the end of Friday October 5th. The Foiled Fox is giving away a $25 gift certificate to three of our readers who leave a comment here on my blog and/or on the Foiled Fox blog telling us something they are grateful for. It does not have to be related to art and craft at all. We will randomly choose a winner from each gratitude post and announce them on Tuesday, October 9th. Now before I move on to the card details I will add that I am very thankful for the people I have met through art and card making, those of you I know through this blog as well as those I have met in person at classes or crops. It is a great community that I love being involved in.

To create today’s gratitude themed card I used a Penny Black Christmas set. The only part of the set that is particularly Christmassy is the bauble hanging on one of the branches. I left that stamp out and used the other two that feature only leaves and berries. I used autumn tones too, three Catherine Pooler inks: spruce, bellini, shea butter. I started by inking the larger of the two stamps in shea butter ink then dabbed some spruce and bellini here and there on the leaves and berries. I spritzed the stamp with water then stamped on hot pressed watercolour paper. The inks had begun to blend after spritzing; I blended them more on the paper with a paintbrush. While there was still ink on the stamp I spritzed it and stamped again resulting in a paler image. I blended the pale leaves and berries with a brush too. I repeated the process with the large stamp then did the same thing with the small stamp and ended up filling 75% of the panel. You could leave the blending step out, I just like to get the look of painted leaves.

I did a little splatter in both spruce and bellini then moved on to the sentiment. To make sure my die cut sentiment and accent strips matched exactly I swiped the spruce inkpad onto some watercolour paper then let it dry. The CP inks are very juicy and gave great coverage. I added double sided adhesive to the back of the spruce coloured watercolour paper then die cut the word ‘thankful’ twice. The die is ‘thankful heart’ combined but I did a little surgery and removed the heart. I layered the two die cuts then worked out where I would put them on my leaf panel. There was an area where the ink and water had splodged so that was the perfect area to cover up with a sentiment. As I was using some stamped words right up next to the die-cut words I did the stamping first in my positioner so I wouldn’t have to try stamping around die-cuts already stuck down! I wonder how I knew to do that?! The stamped words are half a phrase from the very useful ‘happy snippets’ set.

I cut a very narrow strip of spruce inked paper with my paper trimmer (linked below) and used a dot adhesive to attach two pieces to the top of the panel. I know ribbon or twine might have looked nice but my matchy-matchy heart wanted spruce green so inked paper was the way to go. I trimmed the panel to match the card front exactly, which seems to be my preference currently and now I have another card to send to someone I am thankful for.

 

Supplies

Stamps: Christmas sprig, happy snippets (PB)

Die: thankful heart (PB)

Inks: spruce, shea butter, bellini (Catherine Pooler)


Paper: hot pressed watercolour paper

Also: glass mat, paper trimmer, stamp positioner, double sided adhesive sheets, dot adhesive
  


Flowers & Scrolls

I have a new glass mat on my work table and it’s been fun trying some of my favourite techniques on the glass surface. To create the backgrounds for these two cards I swiped distress oxide inks on the glass, spritzed some water over the ink then swiped hot pressed watercolour paper through it.

For this card the oxide inks were wild honey and lucky clover. I topped the panel with the scrolls half edger die cut and a stacked sentiment. I backed the white cardstock with adhesive sheet first before cutting to make it easier to attach.

The second background was made by swiping watercolour paper through wild honey, lucky clover and abandoned coral oxide inks then splattering some more ink and water over the top.

This one I decorated with the ‘floral half’ die cut edger. Both decorative dies cut all the intricate detail on one side and leave the opposite edge uncut

The cutterpillar glass mat worked beautifully for smooshing ink onto. I managed to spill half a bottle of glue on it while putting these cards together and ended up leaving it to dry for a day or two then peeled it off with ease. I have linked to the glass mat below so you can take a look (in the photo it is shown on top of the Cutterpillar Glow light pad). I really like the size as I can complete inky-painty projects on it but it doesn’t take over my whole work table. I will share more about it as I put it through its paces with other techniques.

Supplies

Dies: scrolls half edger, floral half, party for you

Inks

Papers: hot pressed watercolour, neenah solar white

Tools: stick-it adhesive, Cutterpillar Glow Tempered Glass mat


Knock knock

I’m collaborating with the Foiled Fox team today so you can read more about these cards on their blog. These are my first cards created with Art Impressions ‘Watercolor’ stamps. The stamps are designed for creating scenes; there are a lot of little stamps depicting stems, branches, foliage and flowers. The stamper can combine them however they wish, use a water soluble ink then blend with a little water to turn all the stamping into ‘watercolor paintings’.

I used a combination of foliage and flower sets to decorate two cards featuring doors from the Art Impressions ‘Door’ set. It was fun to create little  scenes around the doors. One ended up being a rustic cabin type door and the other a simple white door at the end of a garden path.

I chose frayed burlap distress ink to stamp one of the doors and grey zig clean color real brush marker to ink the other door. I also used the zig markers for the floral and foliage stamps. I learnt on the Art Impressions youtube channel that the best way to stamp the flowers and leaves is to ink them, then stamp several times just slightly offset each time. That way you create more volume and variety in colour. After you have done your stamping (with watersoluble inks like distress and zig clean color) you can blend all the images with a damp brush to create the watercolour look.

I added some elements with the zig markers and watercolour pencils to fill out the scenes. front path, bricks and planks around the doors and a hand drawn window. Pop over to the Foiled Fox blog to read about my method in more detail.

I really enjoyed playing with these stamps to create my own scenes. The stamps are tiny but you can fill a garden quickly by stamping a mass of flowers and foliage then blending it every so lightly with water. I would love to hear from you in the comments below if you have already done some creating with the Art Impressions watercolour stamps or if you are feeling inspired to give it a try. I will definitely be back with more scenes.

Supplies

Art Impressions Stamps:  WC Foliage set 3, WC Flower set 3, WC door set, WC Foliage set 1, Flower

MFT Stamps: Anything but Basic Friend set

Inks: frayed burlap distress ink, versafine sepia, versafine olympia green

Dies: Penny Black border edgers

Papers: cold pressed watercolour paper, neenah natural white, green cardstocks

Also: zig clean color real brush pens, watercolor pencils


Belle

The zigs & zags stencil has popped up again today as a background for this die cut and watercoloured flower. I applied deco transfer gel directly to my card base (neenah solar white 110lb) then ran it through my minc with white foil. The result is a subtle chevron background. I wanted my flower to match the white card base exactly so I used the same neenah solar white which meant I did not add much water at all when blending my zig pens after stamping. I used a mix of blue, pink and purple and a blue/green combo on the leaves and stem then just a damp brush to blend with water. I made sure the blending was dry before stamping the black centre several times then used the co-ordinating die to cut out the flower plus a white foam one to pop it up over the background.

The little black banner was die cut with one of the dies from the PB ‘pocket full’ die set. I have pulled out all my little label, banner and tag dies from different sets and grouped them together so I can quickly cut the right size for a sentiment. This sentiment from the handy ‘banner sentiments’ set is embossed in white powder.

Supplies

Stamps: belle, banner sentiments

Die: belle cut out, a pocket full

Stencil: zigs & zags

Paper: neenah solar white, neenah epic black
 
Markers: kuretake zig clean color real brush pens pink, blue, violet, cobalt blue, green, black

Also: transfer gel, white foil, foam, minc, white embossing powder

 

 


Alcohol ink splatter

I hope you have enjoyed my alcohol ink projects this week. I could have happily continued playing with colour combinations and different techniques but other projects beckoned.

Once again I used a colour combination curated by Ranger; this one is called ‘Cottage Path’ and includes slate, currant and meadow. I worked on the heavyweight yupo paper and dropped inks randomly over the panel to begin. Once there was plenty of coverage I used a small cheap paintbrush (plastic bristles) to flick rubbing alcohol as well as the ‘cottage path’ inks over the panel. The result is very fine circles over the top of the larger blobs of colour.

I matched my cardstock to the ink colours and die cut a tree from green using the Penny Black ‘branching out’ die then matted my panel with the same colour. On the other card I cut a couple of ‘cherry blossom’ die cuts plus a sentiment.

Supplies

Dies: branching out, cherry blossom, many thanks

Inks: Cottage path alcohol inks (Ranger)

Paper: heavyweight yupo (Legion) natural white (neenah), burgandy and green