Happy Birthday, Dad

I waited to hear from my dad before I posted this card on the blog. It was mailed to him a few weeks back but the postal service is an unpredictable animal so I had no idea when it would arrive in Australia. On the same day I mailed a package of cards to my mother for her to use. I intentionally did not put my dad’s birthday card in as I was sure a package would arrive later than a single card. Not so. A birthday present posted in the other direction from my parents to me was sent airmail but arrived almost 2 months later. As my mum would say, ‘You just never know!” A large and precious parcel arrived for my family on Friday sent by my father the previous Tuesday. Three days! So it is possible.

But enough about the postal service. This rustic homestead card is made with a stamp from Darkroom Door. When I was in Australia late last year I visited Rachel Greig and Stewart Yule, founders and owners of Darkroom Door and was treated to a behind the scenes tour of the stamp making process. I spent a wonderful morning talking with Rachel about a range of creative topics including my introduction of classes using Darkroom Door stamps to my teaching schedule. I am so grateful for Rachel’s support of my classes, as are my students!

When my dad came to pick me up he browsed some of the stamps on display in the studio. Two in particular caught his eye, the one in his hand above featuring the Norah Head lighthouse that he and I toured  the following week and the one on this birthday card. This homestead is representative of older farm buildings that dot the Australian country side. The corrugated iron on the roof is something I rarely see in Canada but common in Australia. I chose to stick to a vintage colour scheme stamping in vintage photo distress ink and black elegant writer pen. I blended parts of the stamped image with water to bring out the shadows.

This card seems all the more appropriate this week as the precious parcel I mentioned earlier contained my father’s memoir written over the last few years about his and my mother’s life experiences and organised into chapters by ‘homesteads’.

Supplies

Stamps: Homestead, Happy Birthday (Darkroom Door)
Inks: vintage photo distress(Ranger), elegant writer pen(Speedball)
Paper: hot pressed watercolour paper, brown cardstock

Advertisements

Spring blossoms

I’ve been wanting to watercolour this image ever since I stamped it as a black silhouette on an earlier card. The details are fairly small so I kept a light hand with the ink and used a stamp positioner so I could add colour little by little. On a piece of cold pressed watercolour paper I stamped first the blossoms in spun sugar distress stain, then added little dots of festive berries stain and blended with a small watercolour brush. I inked the stems with a gathered twigs distress marker then, after stamping blended on the paper, again with a fine tip brush. I added gathered twigs stain splattered around the blooms.

I chose not to add a sentiment but pulled out some ribbon to complete the card.

The technique for this one was almost the same but I used rough watercolour paper and more water so the blooms are more like blobs in some places. It’s more of an abstract look.

This one I finished off  with bookbinding thread and a sentiment. Both cards are very simple but I felt that a delicate stamp called for a delicate card.

Supplies

Stamps: spring blossoms, spiritual snippets (PB)
Inks: spun sugar, festive berries, gathered twigs, milled lavender, dusty concord, distress stains (Ranger)
Paper: cold pressed and rough watercolour paper (Fabriano)
Also: bookbinding thread, red ribbon


Wildflowers blue

This one is for my mother’s card stash. I try to keep her well stocked with cards but I know she is better than me at sending them  so she goes through them faster than I do. As soon as I finished this one I knew she would like it; we both love flowers with blue in them, cornflowers, hydrangeas, delphiniums. I used one of the silhouette flower stamps from the Darkroom Door set, ‘Wildflowers vol 2’.

I inked the top half of the stamp in blueprint sketch distress stain, spritzed it lightly and stamped several times across the panel. Next I inked the stems in the lower half of the stamp, and a few dots above that, with forest moss distress stain and again stamped across the panel. For some variety in colour I dabbed some dusty concord distress stain on the flower sections and stamped than over the floral area. You can see in the closeup, the stamping is quite loose but the overall effect is a garden of blue flowers. Just what I wanted.

I’ll be getting this one and some others in the mail to you soon, Mum 🙂

Supplies

Stamps: Wildflowers vol 2 (Darkroom Door)
Inks: blueprint sketch, dusty concord, forest moss distress stains (Ranger)
Paper: hot pressed watercolour paper (Fabriano) olive green cardstock


More Matelasse

I have a few more cards made with matelasse style backgrounds topped with bright brusho elements. I once again chose intricate dies for the backgrounds. In the cards above and below I embossed watercolour paper with the no two are alike die. For focal elements I die-cut the city skyline, some snowflakes and a couple of words from a panel painted with turquoise and cobalt blue brusho.

The background below was embossed with the bird flower doily then matted with the same painted paper I die cut the dove from. All the dies I used for these three cards are listed and linked below.

I used my big shot/big kick to emboss these panels and my ‘sandwich’ was:

  1. multipurpose platform with one tab showing and one flipped open out of the way
  2. cutting plate
  3. silicon mat
  4. watercolour paper (damp)
  5. die
  6. cutting plate

 

Supplies
Also: Tombow adhesive dots, zig two way glue pen
Paper: hot and cold pressed watercolour paper

 


Matelasse cards & a winner

I have a couple of cards made using die cuts today but first the winner of last Monday’s giveaway from The Foiled Fox. Thank you to The Foiled Fox for the gift certificate and thank you to everyone who participated. I enjoyed reading what is on your wishlists.
The winner is pansy47  who commented:
“I can’t seem to pick a favorite, but if I could it would be a die of some sort….background, words, scalloped rectangles, etc.”
Congratulations Pansy47, I will email you with the details and you will need to pick a favorite or two!
I came across a card recently with a completely embossed background like the one above. I was reminded that I can use my dies for embossing as well as cutting. After playing around with several dies I’ve decided the most impressive for this technique are the intricate ones that I don’t always reach for when cutting because of all the tiny pieces that have to be pressed out of the cardstock or die. As an embossed background I think it looks just like a matelasse quilt with all the quilting done on one colour fabric in the same colour thread. I added to my background a collection of flowers and leaves cut from a watercolour panel painted with scarlet brusho. If you haven’t embossed with your dies before just search ’embossing with dies’ to see how to do it with your particular die cut machine. To get a good impression I spritzed water on my watercolour paper first before putting it through the machine.
Supplies
Also: Tombow adhesive dots
Paper: hot and cold pressed watercolour paper

Hand painted floral

Today’s card features a hand painted flower and a hand lettered sentiment. I am open to suggestions as to what type of flower it is; it looks like it could be a dahlia, or perhaps a peony or pink cornflower. I am also a bit hazy on what I used to paint it – sorry – again! It was just a painting exercise that turned out looking like a real flower so I decided to turn it into a card. It could be distress stain or peerless watercolours. I matted the flower panel in a teal to match the leaves then popped a handlettered sentiment on a die cut tag.

Hope you are having a delightful day.
By the way The Foiled Fox is having a St Patrick’s Day sale this weekend, go check it out. Foiled Fox kindly sent me the Peerless watercolours that may or may not have been used on this card. They also sent me the beautiful nib holder that definitely was used to write that sentiment.


A Sweet Friendship

Sweet friendship Heather Telford

I hesitate to call this a ‘no line watercolour card because I can see the outline stamping quite clearly in most places. The technique is one I regularly use where I stamp with either distress stains or distress inks then blend colour out of the stamped image with a damp paint brush to fill the interior shapes, in this case petals and leaves.

sweet friendship Heather Telford

I stamped the ‘first blush’ outline stamp from Penny Black in wild honey ink on cold pressed watercolour paper then stamped it on masking paper also. Believe it or not I cut a fiddly mask adequately enough to mask my first stamped image so I could stamp another overlapping the first. That is how I managed blossoms behind blossoms. With all the stamping done I picked up a small round watercolour brush (probably a size 2 or 3) and started painting worn lipstick stain into the petals. The pink stain blended with the wild honey stamped ink to make a coral colour. While the petals were still damp I dropped some spiced marmalade distress stain into the petals to give me light and dark areas. I filled the stems and leaves with forest moss stain then, when all was dry, drew some centres in the blossoms with a spiced marmalade distress marker.

sweet friendship closeup Heather Telford

To finish the card I stamped the scripture sentiment about friendship in versafine ink and coloured in the word ‘sweet’ to make it solid like the rest.  I have a simpler design with this same sweet blossom stamp to share another day. I’m joining in with Kathy Racoosin’s 30 day colouring challenge again as I imagine many of you are too.

Supplies:

Stamps:   first blush, faith (PB)
Cardstock:  cold pressed watercolour paper, olive green cardstock
Ink: versafine olympia green & vintage sepia (Tsukineko) forest moss, worn lipstick, spiced marmalade distress stains, wild honey distress ink (Ranger)