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Poetic

I think brusho paints are the perfect medium for autumn leaves. The variation in colour from even one little tub of brusho reminds me of the beautiful variation in autumn leaves. Brusho can be blended for smooth transitions from light to dark or left unblended which ends up looking like the blemishes found on many leaves. When deciding how to paint the new leaf stamp, Poetic, I knew brusho would help me achieve the look I wanted.

I started by stamping the leaf three times on hot pressed watercolour paper in Morocco memento ink. I overlapped the leaves but without re-inking the stamp so I ended up with one dark leaf (foreground) and two paler leaves as my guides for painting. I painted the leaves from left to right adding one colour of brusho to one leaf at a time. I sprinkled dark brown on the first leaf and used a waterbrush to blend it out to the edges of the leaf keeping some areas variegated. I dried the leaf completely before starting on the second one with terracotta brusho and following the same process. Again I dried the panel completely before doing the final leaf in sandstone.

After I had painted all the leaves I sprinkled a little of each colour of brusho over the corresponding leaf and spritzed with water from above. The result was some extra texture on the leaves and some colourful splatter over the edges. To add realism I used a fine brush to paint some veins on the leaves. Finally I created a stacked die cut of the word Grateful and matted in dark brown and the same rust as for the die cut.

Supplies

Stamp: Poetic (PB)
Die: words of gratitude (PB)
Cardstock: hot pressed watercolour paper, natural white cardstock (Neenah) dark brown and rust cardstock
Ink: Morocco memento ink (Tsukineko)
Paint: dark brown, terracotta, sandstone brusho (Colourcraft)

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Roses three ways

I love to use distress stains applied with the sponge dauber so I had to try them with this stamp from Darkroom Door. I tried two other techniques shown further down in the post and taught a couple more techniques in my most recent class. For the card above I used a stamp positioner so I could add one colour at a time. I inked the Roses stamp with Victorian velvet and stamped on hot pressed watercolour paper.  I then dabbed the Aged Mahogany stain on the centres of the Roses in the stamp and and stamped again. The colours blended as both were wet. I chose to make all the accents black, adding an embossed sentiment from Bright Blossoms vol 1, a black mat, b&w gingham ribbon and three dots of black crystal drops.

I stuck with the same two distress stains for the next card but adding them over the embossed image created the negative of the one above.

I painted Victorian velvet stain over the whole embossed image then added aged mahogany with a paintbrush here and there to create darker roses or just darker accents. I finished it off again with a ribbon and embossed sentiment, framing the sentiment by swiping the crimson red ink around the edges of the panel then embossing in clear powder.

My third technique was done with Memento ink but would work well with any dye based water soluble ink. I covered the stamp with memento love letter ink then darkened the centres of the roses with a rhubarb stalk marker, spritzed the stamp lightly and stamped it on hot pressed watercolour paper.

I used a small round watercolour brush (or water brush, can’t remember) to blend the stamped ink. This gave the petals a soft pink colour, left the stamped areas as dark shadows and in a few places where I didn’t blend at all there are some contrasting white areas.

I finished it off with gold accents running the versamark pad around the edges of the sentiment panel, rose panel and card front then embossing those edges in gold powder.

The stamp itself is very detailed so it doesn’t need too much in the way of colouring but I was happy to come up with techniques that gave me the option of sharper images or softer blended images.

Supplies

Stamps: RosesBright Blossoms vol 1 & 2 (Darkroom Door)
Inks: versamark, versafine onyx black & crimson red, memento love letter ink, memento rhubarb stalk marker (Tsukineko) Victorian Velvet & Aged Mahogany distress stains (Ranger)
Papers: hot pressed watercolour paper, neenah solar white & epic black cardstock
Also: gold & clear embossing powder, gingham ribbon, burgandy satin ribbon, nuvo black ebony crystal drops, gold cord

 

 


Magnolia Rhapsody

magnolia rhapsody Heather Telford

Penny Black has added more lovely brushstroke stamps to their collection including this beauty, Magnolia Rhapsody. I have several techniques I use with my brushstroke stamps; for this card I used memento markers, blending colour both on the stamp and on the paper. Using a stamp positioner I started by stamping the whole image in angel pink memento ink; this gave me a reference image which helped me apply the darker inks in the right places on the stamp. Next I inked all the petals with an angel pink marker then added lilac posies ink to the flower centres and petal tips. I spritzed lightly before stamping so the colour would mix a little then blended further on the paper with a damp brush. After finishing the petals I inked and stamped the leaves, then the branch and twigs.

magnolia rhapsody Heather Telford

 

To give a bit of a bokeh look to the scene I stamped again around the main image without applying more ink. The result was pale pink and green petals and leaves in the background.  I tried out the morning dew Nuvo crystal drops on petals and leaves; you might be able to see my little dew drops in the photo below. I added a thin strip of cardstock to the bottom of the card base and balanced it with bit of sponged green at the top.

magnolia rhapsody close up Heather Telford

Thanks for dropping in today.

Supplies

Stamps: magnolia rhapsody, stitched flowers (PB)
Ink: angel pink, lilac posies, pistachio, olive grove, espresso truffle, tuxedo black memento markers & versafine onyx black ink (Tsukineko)
Also: Nuvo ‘morning dew’ crystal drops
Paper: hotpressed 100% cotton watercolour paper, olive textured cardstock


Purple Iris

dsc_1338-purple-iris-side-heather-telford

This iris card is a project from last year; it features one of my favourite techniques for brush stroke stamps: inking with memento markers. You could use any water soluble markers I imagine, it is easy to apply colour to the stamp with them and their water solubility makes it possible to get nice colour blends. I stamped on a piece of hot pressed watercolour paper which I had splattered some masking fluid over.

dsc_1336-purple-iris-close-up-heather-telford

I began with some drips of water on the watercolour paper panel. I inked the stamp with the markers listed below, spritzed the stamp and used the MISTI to stamp on the panel. Wherever the stamp hit the water droplets it bled into the surrounding area. I also blended the ink with a paint brush and water. When the panel was almost dry I stamped again in purple and green to get some extra definition on the leaves and petals. To frame the iris I painted some very diluted northern pine ink around the background then waited for it to dry again before adding some splatter.

I remember when I did made this panel I ended up stamping several at the same time; some ended up darker and more defined, others were pale and looser. It all depended on how much ink and water I applied to the stamp.

Thanks for dropping in; I’ll be back tomorrow with brand new stamps from Penny Black!

Supplies:
Stamps: Pure Iris(PB)
Inks:  Memento Cantaloupe, Grape Jelly, Sweet Plum, Olive Grove, Pistachio (Tsukineko)
Cardstock: Hot pressed Fabriano watercolour paper, Olive Green cardstock
Also: masking fluid


Stillness

stillness Heather Telford

After a week of balmy temperatures hovering around zero, we are back to real winter weather again and bright scenes like this one. Winter here is often prettiest when it’s the coldest.

stillness Heather Telford

I stamped and embossed this scene using ‘winter ledge’ and a stamp positioner so I could get the thin layer of snow on the branches. The trick to this is to stamp first in versamark then move the cardstock up ever so slightly then stamp in pigment ink, in this case versafine onyx black. Once the panel is stamped twice you can emboss both images at once. The embossing resists ink once you sponge or paint over the top. I sponged this scene in memento Danube blue ink creating snowy hills behind the branches with post-it note masks.

stillness close up Heather Telford

I hesitate to say that I hope you are all staying warm as I know our family in Australia have been wishing for a little respite from the heat. I hope you are enjoying the weather, whatever the weather, whether you like it or not!

Supplies

Stamps: winter ledge, snippets (PB)
Inks: versamark, versafine onyx black, memento danube blue (Tsukineko)
Papers: Neenah solar white
Also: clear embossing powder


African Trees 2 Ways

watercolour trees Heather Telford

I have something new to share with you today, some stamps from my homeland! No, not Africa, Australia. The images are of African trees but the stamps themselves are from Darkroom Door in Australia. I have recently added Darkroom Door designs to my teaching schedule so I will also be sharing some projects here on the blog. My first class with Darkroom Door stamps is in February; it features these trees and you can find it on my Upcoming Classes page.

watercolour trees Heather Telford

I decided to make two cards of similar design but with different techniques. On the one above I painted a distress stain background to  create a graduated wash then stamped the trees in distress inks. I did first and second generation stamping to get some paler more distant trees. I stamped and spritzed the darker foreground trees then painted grass at the base.

brayered background &  trees Heather Telford

The second card doesn’t include any watercolouring. I began by brayering a pale green sky, dark at the bottom and pale at the top. I used first and second generation stamping again to add background trees then sponged some ground at the base and stamped darker trees followed by even darker ground.  I like the misty feel of this one; I haven’t been to the African plains but I think maybe they look a bit like this in the early morning or perhaps when its very dry and dust is in the air.

brayered background &  trees Heather Telford

Supplies:

Stamps:   African Trees (Darkroom Door)
Inks:  Memento new sprout, bamboo leaves, olive grove (Tsukineko) & Distress peeled paint, forest moss stains and inks (Ranger)
Cardstock:  hot pressed watercolour paper, neenah natural white cardstock, co-ordinating green cardstock


Magnolia

magnolia Heather Telford

I thought I’d share a spring bloom even though it will be a long time before we see any around here. We are experiencing serious winter weather right now; we’ve got plenty of snow, plenty of ice and plenty of cold! I’m sure I will be creating more wintry scenes in the weeks ahead because although cold outside, it is also beautiful.

To create this watercoloured magnolia I inked the ‘unfolding’ stamp with memento markers, spritzed the stamp and stamped on cold pressed watercolour paper. I used a brush to blend colour within the petals and stems and to splatter some ink over the stamped image. Creating such a loose print meant that the sepals on the stamp were lost so I drew them on after the stamping dried.

magnolia closeup Heather Telford

Supplies:

Stamps: The Unfolding (PB)
Inks:  potter’s clay, espresso truffle, cantaloupe, rose bud memento inks (Tsukineko)
Cardstock: Fabriano 100% cotton cold pressed watercolour paper, coordinating cardstock for mats