Distress oxide trials – Desaturation

Can you tell I like the way ‘distress oxide trials’ sounds like an significant chemical experiment? That’s why I called today’s post ‘desaturation’ rather than just ‘stamping with water! The effect does come, however, from stamping with water. I think it is my favourite technique so far. I began by blending the inks onto hot pressed watercolour paper. They do blend nicely on neenah classic crest paper but they blend even better on watercolour paper. By blending I mean sponging ink onto the paper, also called inking by some crafters.

For the these three cards I sponged three colours onto the paper and overlapped them to get nice soft blended colours. The sponging doesn’t take long, it doesn’t leave marks shaped like the edge of your applicator and it creates intense colour.

After sponging my colours over the whole panel I put the panel into my MISTI, positioned my stamp then spritzed it with water. All the stamps used for these cards are red rubber; (slapstick cling from Penny Black, names listed below) I haven’t tried with clear stamps yet. The stamp just has to hold onto the water for the technique to work.

After stamping a water print onto the blended colour, I lifted the stamp and dabbed a paper towel over the print. It left a pale image on the coloured panel.

It’s not a really sharp image but it is definitely recognisable and I love the look.

The trials are not over but if you are looking for a technique to start with try some sponging; the finish is so rich and creamy. Then if you are feeling scientific try some desaturation as well. If you have thought of a technique you’d like me to try please leave me a comment below.

Supplies

Stamps: full of glee, featheryEffulgent, stitched flowers, happy snippets (PB)
Die: tagged, omg (PB)
Inks: worn lipstick, broken china, fossilized amber, wilted violet, peeled paint distress oxide inks (Ranger) versamark, versafine onyx black & smokey gray (Tsukineko)
Papers: hot pressed watercolour paper, neenah solar white, neenah epic black, violet cardstock
Also: gold & white embossing powder, white ribbon, gold thread


Distress oxide trials – brushstroke floral

The distress oxide trials continue with some brushstroke floral stamps. I generally use distress stains or markers with these stamps because I love to blend the colours either on the paper or the stamp to create the look of a watercolour painting. I was happy with the solid, but blended colour I achieved with the three oxide inks, quite different but muted and pretty.

As with earlier experiments the blending is lovely and smooth. I was able to blend blue into both the red petals and the green leaves by using my MISTI to apply one colour at a time. I inked and stamped the petals first in fired brick, wiping off any stray ink from the leaves with a wet wipe before stamping. I inked and stamped the leaves and stems in peeled paint next.  I wanted some blended accents on the both flowers and leaves so I dabbed the faded jeans ink in a few places, spritzed to soften sharp edges then stamped again.  The chalky look is quite different from the original distress inks but the blending is just as smooth. I used cold pressed watercolour paper so there is some nice texture showing through the solid ink.

I probably could have stamped the sentiment in faded jeans oxide ink but I my ink of choice for sentiments continues to be versafine. The majestic blue co-ordinated beautifully and I was able to find the same colour for my mat also.

Thank you for your responses to my first distress oxide post; I am interested to hear what other people are trying and happy to prove any insights as I experiment. I know some people are wondering whether it is worth getting the distress oxides if you have the original distress inks. I will give some feedback as I post my experiments and then give a wrap up when I’ve tried a range of techniques.


The distress oxide trials

The trials have begun. Shauna at The Foiled Fox sent me some distress oxide inks to try. I have been intrigued by the videos and projects I’ve seen around the place so was keen to play with them myself. I started by mixing some diluted ink on a craft mat then swiped different papers through it. I chose bristol cardstock, hot pressed watercolour paper and neenah solar white 110lb cardstock.

The card above features the bristol cardstock. It picked up the colour well, the inks blended and the watermarks from splattering made nice light patches with dark edges. I used two main colours, a pink and a blue (what a surprise!) then I splattered a little yellow at the end of my experimenting.

The panel below is made from the hot pressed watercolour piece. The results were very similar but the blending was even smoother between the colours.

I chose not to make a card from the sample on  neenah solar white. It worked but the colours did not blend or spread as nicely in my opinion. These are just the beginning of my experiments of course and only three colours but there is more to come. The inks blended just as beautifully as the original distress inks but dry opaque or semi opaque, perfect for a solid background.

Supplies:

Stamps: delicate flowers, stitched flowers, happy snippets
Dies: flower frolic, tagged
Inks: faded jeans, worn lipstick, fossilized amber distress oxide inks (Ranger) versafine majestic blue (Tsukineko)
Papers: hot pressed watercolour paper, bristol paper, stardream blue cardstock, black cardstock